Will I see my Husband Again after Death

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Will I see my Husband Again after Death

Will I see my Husband Again after Death

Some have faith in afterlife where lost loved ones wait for them with open arms. But others find it harder to believe and will never be able to accept that their loved ones are gone forever. If you belong to the latter group, this article may help you cope with your loss more by opening up a different perspective on the idea of life after death.

It is not clear that we will see our loved ones after death. For some, though, it is a guarantee of the afterlife, while others believe they should live their lives to the fullest because there may be no afterlife. 

I am undecided on which belief I will follow. Still, I know for sure that when my husband dies and joins his loved ones in heaven, he will be with them until the time comes for them to return to this earth as reincarnated beings.

A Heartbreaking story — Life after Husband Death

The idea of reincarnation is a common belief, yet there are still many who do not believe in it and think of it as a theory. Many argue that people remember past lives, but not the details. 

Others say that the mind can’t deal with all its information. Therefore, we never remember anything clearly. Some even say that we can’t even handle one thing well, let alone multiple ones at once.

While these arguments are valid, they don’t deny that some may have had past lives as told by believers and followers of reincarnation. 

A few years ago, my husband and I were in a very heated argument. It had been going on for at least an hour, and I grew angrier. This was not the healthiest way to work through my emotions, as you can probably imagine.

When he said something that struck me as particularly hurtful, the argument came to a head. I grabbed onto him with all my strength and screamed at him some more.

I strained my neck so hard that it immediately began to ache to pull myself away from him. The result was no surprise–an excruciating shooting pain shot through my neck, and for at least 15 minutes, I could barely move my head.

The pain got worse as time went on–I felt like the muscles in my neck were being torn apart by some unseen force, but I ignored the pain. After all, what could be so important that it was worth making myself miserable?

I desperately wanted to get this argument over with as quickly as possible. But unfortunately, even though the pain was getting worse and more intense every moment, we continued to argue.

During the argument, my husband and I were so fixated on our points of view that we weren’t even listening to each other. Instead, we were waiting for the opportunity to speak again. That’s when I noticed something.

Although we may have been talking to each other, he listened to me. Whenever I spoke, his body would soften, and his eyebrows would lower slightly. He leaned toward me slightly as he listened intently to every word I said (even if it was only one syllable).

The more I looked into his eyes, the more I noticed how much kindness and love were reflected at me. He wasn’t just waiting for his turn to speak. He wanted to hear what I had to say–even if it meant he had to bite his tongue a few times and go through some pain.

Faith in Afterlife

Some have faith in afterlife where lost loved ones wait for them with open arms. But others find it harder to believe, and will never be able to accept that their loved ones are gone forever. If you belong to the latter group, this article may help you cope with your loss more, by opening up a different perspective on the idea of life after death.

Believers in a life after death believe that it is possible to see our deceased loved ones again, either in a “Heavenly” or “Purgatory-type” afterlife.

The loss of a spouse isn’t just an emotional blow. It can in fact be more painful to lose someone than actually losing them physically, because we have a chance to see them again one day. This helps us cope with the loss, because we get hope and can live with it. We are believers until they prove us wrong.

Unfortunately, there is very little evidence to prove that our loved ones wait for us on the other side. On the contrary, there are many cases where people claim that their deceased loved ones have visited them, either in dreams or in real life.

Life Expectancy After Death of Spouse

The first thing that needs to be considered is whether or not you will remarry. Remarriage can impact your life expectancy from 1-10 years, depending on your age and health status. 

If you are in relatively good health, do not plan on remarrying, or are about to turn 65 years old (for women) or 70 years old (for men) then there is a good chance that you will live longer than 10 years after the death of your spouse.

If you are under 65 years old, your life expectancy will also be impacted by whether or not you have children. If you live with your spouse and have children, your life expectancy drops dramatically. 

If only one parent lives with the children, but remarries, the life expectancy drops to about 10 years. However, if both parents are still alive and single, then the life expectancy is increased (to about 14 years) however this average increases by replacing the lost love in their lives.

Life expectancy tables are usually based on data provided by Social Security Administration (SSA), supplemented with data from the U.S. government Centers for Disease Control (CDC). 

CDC publishes annual mortality statistics for all causes and by cause of death in its National Vital Statistics Reports. It also provides annual life expectancy tables based on the CDC life table set at 5 years earlier than SSA’s current latest year life tables. CDC’s life tables are consistent with current SSA life expectancy tables. SSA uses them for its internal mortality projections.

The CDC life table set at a date 5 years earlier than SSA’s current year life tables is used in forecasting Social Security’s future financial status. These forecasts were the official basis of the Trustees’ 1997 annual report to Congress on the long-range adequacy of Social Security revenues to cover benefit payments.